Plagiarism Quiz

 

In order to pass ENG 1113 and ENG 1213, you must make a perfect score on this quiz. You may take the quiz as many times as necessary by the date designated in Cruiser under My Assignments.  To submit answers, simply number a document 1-10 and write down the letter choice for each answer, submitting that under the MY ASSIGNMENT for this quiz.

 

Plagiarism is the undocumented use in your work of someone else’s ideas and words. These can be plagiarized from books, magazines, recordings, speeches, newspapers, etc.  Whether intentional or accidental, plagiarism is a problem because the reader cannot distinguish between original and referenced material. Your handbook defines plagiarism further and gives you tips for avoiding it. Please read the sections on plagiarism in your handbook (check under “plagiarism” in the index). Use that information, plus the section on MLA documentation, to answer the questions on this quiz.

 

In this class, we use the MLA style of documentation to credit words or ideas of other people we incorporate into our work. Documentation requires two components: parenthetical documentation (also called in-text citation) and works cited list.  Please read and consult your handbook to not only answer questions on this quiz, but also to write your papers.

 

We incorporate outside sources into our papers by quoting, paraphrasing, or summarizing.  You will need to pay close attention to the format and rules concerning short, long, and indirect source quotations.  Your handbook discusses all three ways of incorporating sources. You will need to know the differences between them in order to answer the questions on this quiz. Correct documentation requires attention to details. Please take your time to read each question thoroughly.

 

Questions refer to the following excerpt from Mark Twain’s book Extracts from Adam’s Diary about Adam and Eve first getting to know each other:

 

Friday: The naming goes recklessly on, in spite of anything I can do.  I had a very good name for the estate, and it was musical and pretty--GARDEN-OF-EDEN.  Privately, I continue to call it that, but not any longer publicly.  The new creature says it is all woods and rocks and scenery, and therefore has no resemblance to a garden. Says it looks like a park, and does not look like anything but a park.  Consequently, without consulting me, it has been new-named--NIAGARA FALLS PARK.  This is sufficiently high-handed, it seems to me.  And already there is a sign up:

 

KEEP OFF

THE GRASS

My life is not as happy as it was. (11)

Works Cited

 

Twain, Mark. Extracts from Adam’s Diary: Translated from the Original. New York: Harper, 1904. Print.

 

 

1.  The new creature says it is all woods and rocks and scenery, and therefore has no resemblance to a garden.


If this quote appeared in an essay without mentioning Twain or the book, the result is

a. Long/block quotation.

b. Short quotation.

c. Summary.

d. Plagiarism.

 

2.  The new creature says it is all woods and rocks and scenery, and therefore has no resemblance to a garden.

If this sentence appears in an essay without mentioning Twain or the book, the result is

a. Plagiarism.

b. Short quotation.

c. Summary.

d. Long/block quotation.

 

3.  Adam finds Eve’s renaming places and creatures in the Garden not only out of control but also arrogant.

 

If this sentence appears in an essay and cites Twain on the works cited page, the result is

a. Short quotation.

b. Long/block quotation.

c. Plagiarism.

d. Summary.

 

4.  Twain brings the story of Adam and Eve to America by placing the Garden of Eden near Niagara Falls, which spans the border of New York, USA, and Ontario, Canada. The information about Niagara Falls in this sentence is:

a.  Plagiarism, using words or ideas without crediting the source.

b.  Plagiarism, unless the reader has read Twain’s book.

c.  Plagiarism, unless the reader is a Niagra Fall’s expert.

d.  Proper use of common knowledge, acceptable and appropriate.

 

5.  The Adam that Mark Twain creates is obviously not happy with his new partner: “The Keep Off The Grass sign is sufficiently high-handed, it seems to me” (11).

 

If the quotation appears in a paper that also includes a works cited page that lists Twain’s book, the result is

a.     Long/block quotation.

b.     Improper use of quotation marks, saying the student’s words are Twain’s.

c.      Short quotation.

d.     Summary.

 

6.  Mark Twain imagines the couple waging a war for dominance in running the garden. Adam complains:

 

I had a very good name for the estate, and it was musical and pretty--GARDEN-OF-EDEN…The new creature says it is all woods and rocks and scenery, and therefore has no resemblance to a garden. Says it looks like a park, and does not look like anything but a park.  Consequently, without consulting me, it has been new-named--NIAGARA FALLS PARK.  This is sufficiently high-handed, it seems to me. (Twain 11)

 

If the information above appears in an essay and includes a complete works cited page, the result is

a.     Indirect Source quotation.

b.     Short quotation.

c.      Incomplete MLA documentation, a technical form of plagiarism.

d.     Long/block quotation.

 

7.  Adam views the keep off the grass sign as just the latest of many affronts to his authority, including Eve renaming the garden (Twain 11).

 

If the sentence appears in a paper that also includes a works cited page that lists Twain’s book, the result is

a.     Summary.

b.     Short quotation.

c.      Improper use of quotation marks, saying the student’s words are Twain’s.

d.     Long/block quotation.

 

8.  The naming goes recklessly on, in spite of anything I can do” (Twain 11).

 

If the quotation appears in an essay that includes a complete works cited page, the result is

a.     Incomplete MLA documentation, a technical form of plagiarism.

b.     Long/block quotation.

c.      Short quotation.

d.     Improper use of quotation marks, saying the student’s words are Twain’s.

 

9.  The naming goes recklessly on, in spite of anything I can do” (Twain 11).

 

If the quotation appears in an essay that does not include a works cited page, the result is

a.     Improper use of quotation marks, saying the student’s words are Twain’s.

b.     Short quotation.

c.      Incomplete MLA documentation, a technical form of plagiarism.

d.     Long/block quotation.

 

10.  The naming goes recklessly on, in spite of anything I can do.

 

If the quotation appears in an essay that includes a complete works cited page but no mention of Twain in the essay text itself, the result is

a.     Short quotation.

b.     Incomplete MLA documentation, a technical form of plagiarism.

c.      Long/block quotation.

d.     Improper use of quotation marks, saying the student’s words are Twain’s.